TETZAVEH - SHABBAT ZACHOR

Posted on February 19th, 2018

Exodus 27:20 - 30:10; Maftir:  Deuteronomy 25:17-19 


BY:  RABBI ANA BONNHEIM for ReformJudaism.org
Each of Us Can Kindle the Light Within


There’s something incredibly powerful about the ner tamid, usually translated as the “eternal light.” Most often, it hangs elegantly in a synagogue just before the ark, right at the front of the sanctuary. (As an interesting aside, the ner tamid was historically placed on the western wall of the synagogue as a reminder that the Holy of Holies was to its west.1) The constancy of the ner tamid was a source of great interest to me as a child. I don’t think I am unique in remembering sitting through services, gazing at the lamp, and wondering whether it really burned all the time, when was it lit for the first time, and who made sure it didn’t go out.

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Terumah

Posted on February 12th, 2018

Exodus 25:1 - 27:19 


D'VAR TORAH BY:  RABBI ANA BONNHEIM for ReformJudaism.org
Giving Gifts of Free Will


As the Torah continues the Israelites’ dramatic, people-building saga, Parashat T’rumah approaches the story from a new angle. Instead of developing the literary adventures of a no-longer-nascent people or focusing on the striking events at Mt. Sinai, this week’s Torah portion is about the details. And these details are not the specifics of community-building or daily life. Rather, they concern, in painstaking minutiae, the construction of the Tabernacle. This is a parashah about holiness, and in the case of Parashat T’rumah, the holiness is in the details.

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Shabbat Shekalim - Mishpatim

Posted on February 5th, 2018

Exodus 21:1 - 24:18 

Rabbi Kerry M. Olitzky for myjewishlearning.com 
Who’s In, Who’s Out
The ordinances in this portion emphasize issues relevant to society and the interactions among groups.


Rules. Parameters. Boundaries. That’s what this Torah portion is all about.  It’s also about that which sets apart ancient Israel from its neighbors. It is infrequent that the text is so self-evident that the reader can clearly determine whether the various things listed in the Torah are designed to keep Israel in, or those who are not part of Israel out. It actually might be one of the reasons why even those inside the community have trouble determining the extent of their commitment to following these regulations.

These rules seem mundane, especially when compared to the grandeur of the previous week’s scene at Mount Sinai, until close to its completion where we read “And the people beheld the God of Israel….” (Ex. 24:10).

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Yitro

Posted on January 29th, 2018

Exodus 18:1 - 20:23


Rabbi Michelle Missagieh for myjewishlearning.com 


Soul Memories
What actually happened at Mount Sinai?


This week’s portion, Yitro, contains a deep memory of our people: the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai.

How do we remember this event in our people’s memory? Perhaps it’s the same way we remember family stories – differently.

All of us have sat around a holiday table reminiscing of past times … when, according to Uncle Joe, he fell off his bike while trying to impress a girl … or maybe Aunt Margie’s version was more accurate: The girl he was trying to impress pushed him off the bike. Or possibly it was the memory of when cousin Lucy vomited all over the Thanksgiving table because she ate an entire watermelon … or was Grandma Ethel’s version accurate: that Lucy got sick because she had stayed up all night studying for an exam?

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Beshalach

Posted on January 22nd, 2018

Exodus 13:17 - 17:16 


BY RABBI DEBORAH JOSELOW for myjewishlearning.com 
Singing On The Way
Despite the fear and exhaustion of journeying from a dark, narrow place, we must remember to accompany our arrivals with song and joy.


This week’s Torah portion is Beshalach. From the Hebrew root meaning “to send,” the name of the portion reflects Pharaoh’s decree that the Israelite people may finally leave the land of Egypt.

For over 400 years, our ancestors were physically and spiritually enslaved. Their release was not only cause for joy but, more importantly, the basis of a mandate that continues to inform all of Jewish life and activity. Then and now, freedom for every one of God’s children is our constant and ultimate pursuit.

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